dog training, dog behavior, dog health
 

Basic Security Dog Training for Your Dog

Many people buy a dog to have as a pet, or as an additional member of their family; but very often they also want the added security a dog gives to their home and will look into security dog training. Depending on what l evel of security you want, almost any breed of dog will provide a deterrent and will be able to raise the alarm when necessary; but if you need a well trained animal which will give you extra security then certain breeds tend to be preferred for this sort of role. Three of most popular breeds for guarding are the German Shepherd dog, the Rottweiler, and the Doberman.

The simplest form of training for a security dog is to bark at unusual or suspicious incidents and to alert the owner. If you have already house trained your dog or trained your dog to sit, then you should not find this too difficult. The main idea with training of all kinds is to observe your dog and ensure he is rewarded for behaviour which you wish to develop. To encourage your animal to alert you with barking then you must call him to you when he barks at the correct stimulus and reward him instantly. This way he will associate his action with a reward and is likely to repeat it.

The next thing to do is to train him to be quiet; since in his enthusiasm for being rewarded for barking, it is likely he might think its ok to continue. Again, it is a matter or rewarding him for his silence, and associating that with a command. In both barking and stop barking training a clicker can be useful since it assists in targeting the precise activity you desire and bringing it instantly to the dog’s attention. Additionally, some trainers recommend a distraction device of some kind, like a tin of small coins which you shake to distract the animal from barking and then reward him for his silence.

More advanced guarding techniques are best left to the more experienced trainers. Bite training and attacking or defending are all activities which require an advanced knowledge and experience in both dogs and the training of those techniques; it is often the case that a ‘character’ test is taken, such as the ‘Schutzhund’ test which was originally developed in Germany to test The German Shepherd dog breed, in order to test if the dog is suitable for performing such behaviour. Security dog training, above and beyond barking and alerts, is not to be taken up lightly by the inexperienced.